KALE, Yes! O’k CSA Recipes Week #2, July 2015

Red Russian at the Faraway Garden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KALE, Yes!

This week we shared our first bunches of “mixed” kale w. both Red Russian and Lacinato kale…Chef Ali Lopez will be giving us ideas all summer long with recipes to accompany some of our share items, this week she offered up what is becoming a very popular item on the Kale list of what to do with:  Kale Chips.  We’ve also included a simple and great recipe for Guac-Kale-Mole and finally, there is a plethora of Kale recipes join this wonderful Facebook group called National Kale Day (October 2, 2015)

ALSO, a little fyi from O’k CSA….there is a info/article being shared and circulated about the issues of possible toxicity of kale.  The article shared on the Integrative Nutrition blog starts out by saying:  “Here at IIN we absolutely love kale – in smoothies, juices, salads, and cooked. It’s been touted as the gold standard when it comes to green vegetables, full of vitamins, minerals, and countless cancer-fighting, health-supportive benefits. 

We’re always on the cutting edge of nutrition, and we acknowledge that it’s a fledgling science. So when we came across this article on the possible toxicity of kale, we were shocked, and we knew we had to share this with you ASAP. 

The latest studies show that kale and other cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and collard greens contain heavy metals, causing chronic fatigue, heart issues, neurological disorders, and even Lyme disease. 

Raw cruciferous vegetables are especially detrimental for thyroid health, since they contain goitrogens, which are naturally-occurring substances that suppress thyroid function by blocking iodine absorption. By cooking these vegetables you can remove the goitrogens.”

Here’s my quick response:  Any brassica grown in unhealthy soil can and likely will draw up the toxins in it. Intentionally planting brassicas, which Kale is, is in fact a permaculture–or organic farming practice to help remove toxins from soil. You don’t eat the plants afterwards, because they did a job for you—taking care of our human “dark-side” tendencies of pollution.  Further you could compost them with mushrooms who likewise remove our human made toxins from nature. When speaking to customers/growers or whomever, please stress the importance to have soil tests done in your gardens/farms and also know your farmer that you are buying from. Logan Labs in Ohio is a good source. Healthy soil makes healthy plants makes healthy eating.

Further information about the links between crop production and healthy plants/veggies that we consume can be found at http://bionutrient.org/. Learning what’s in your soil, and being passed to plants and then humans IS important news but isn’t shared in this article.  Let’s not start a wildfire fear that can cause undo damage to a perfectly wonderful plant and vegetable.

ANYWAYS, we still say: KALE YES! recipes below:

photo credit: Nellie Eve

photo credit: Nellie Eve

 

Baked Kale Chips

1 bunch kale

1 tablespoon olive oil


Sea salt, to taste

Preheat oven to 300°F. Rinse and dry the kale, then remove the stems and tough center ribs. Cut into large pieces, toss with olive oil in a bowl then sprinkle with salt. Arrange leaves in a single layer on a large baking sheet Bake for 20 minutes, or until crisp. Watch that they don’t burn! Place baking sheet on a rack to cool.

Kale Chips recipe shared by Chef Ali Lopez

Guac-Kale-Mole

Smashed avocado
Chopped kale

Chopped red onion
Diced jalapeno
Garlic
Lemon juice

Mix, share and be merry! Shared by Kate W.

Thanks for checking out these recipes! For more info about O’k CSA, join our Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/PennyOKrebiehl/timeline

[email protected]
www.pennyokart.comIMG_7591

 

 

O’k CSA News, Summer & Scapes Week #1…..Very O’k and Growing Along….

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Friday, June 26th, 2015

SUMMER GREETINGS! 

We know it’s Summer, when the garlic scapes start their “curling”, and they went into a frenzied twist and turn over the last week!  We will include a bit of our first newsletter here, as well as a few recipes from this week’s share, including Garlic Scape Pesto, Radish Pasta, and Rhubarb Krisp!

An opening FYI…..

Not signed up in our O’k CSA and would like to become a share-member?  Check in w. us  the second week of July and we’ll let you know if we can add on a few more members.  We are being careful to wtch and see how our crops are producing, before expanding beyond our present 15 share-member families.

ALSO, folks can begin visiting our Friday Market the second week of July (11th) to see what produce we have to offer for sale.  We’ve noticed in the last several years that our location at the corner of Seventh and Oak is a heavily foot-trafficked place!  So this Friday Market, from 4-6 pm is for those who happen by!

Beginning now w. a story-telling and little back-paddling….

The aim of O’k CSA is to explore and have fun sharing connections–as in community—between people, gardening & biological farming, Art, and the practice of ecological design and thinking.
We began our CSA enterprise as a “project” and with the support of Little Artshram in 2007 holding gardening and summer art-farm workshops for children and youth on the old State Hospital property and farm site.

We continued with an internship program for young people and adults and announced our first Community Supported Agriculture and Art (CSA + A) offerings to a small group of five families.

We are now working year-long, as a separate business, with Penny Krebiehl owner and proprietress. We use a operational system designed as a “cooperative”, with private land-owners and other garden-farmers. We are at nine (9) different locations on about 4000 sq. feet of Northern Michigan soil!

Gardens all around town….and a few farther out….

Cedar Lake East & North Garden-Farms, 12408 West Bay, TC (Beginning to design/layout, prep beds, amend soil)
DIGs, 510 Second St., TC (Our home-base for plants, seedlings and small mostly cold crop beds)
Far Away Garden, @ Baker’s in Marion (BIG space–pictured above—to hopefully grow lotsa’ corn, viney, and root crops)
Frida’s Folly, 1120 W. Front St., TC (Mainly onion/garlic and lettuce growing garden-farm)
Little Artshram Teaching Garden & Cordia Plot, 875 Red Dr. TC (Longtime, wonderful sunny growing space, with perennial herbs & fruit)  We helped the residents and staff of Cordia @ The Village of GT Commons plant a half plot for their use.
Peace Patch, Seventh St., TC (This is our “host” on share-day, and full of brassicas and a variety of veg.)
Sunshine Farm, 501 Seventh St.,TC (A new garden hosting potatoes, tomatoes and peppers and more.)
(To be named garden), Joe Buteyn & Crystal Mason & Family

This week we are sharing:

  • Garlic scapes
  • Radishes—-w. a great recipes from Chef Ali
  • A sample of Oyster Mushrooms
  • Salad greens
  • Swiss chard and kale
  • Rhubarb—-w. a nice variation of a “Krisp” from the Moosewood Cookbook
  • and a lovely, Flower and herb bouquet

And recipes to try:


Very O’k Garlic Scape Pesto

Ingredients: garlic scapes cut into pieces, sunflower seeds, parmesan cheese, olive oil, sea salt

Quantity of each ingredient? It depends. I learned to make pesto from an Italian family. Which means, taste and test as you go along, adding what you need. Our batch came out perfect….with a good garlic scape kick to it!

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Sauteed Radishes w/ Radish leaf pesto pasta

Pesto
2 cups lightly packed radish leaves (from about 1 large bunch), tough stems removed
1 cup almonds
1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese
3/4 teaspoon fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
pinch of crushed red pepper flakes
1/4 cup garlic olive oil + more to thin if necessary
2 tablespoons Fustinis Sicilian Lemon Vinegar

Sauteed Radishes
1 1/2 cups radishes, sliced in half and stems removed
1 tablespoon Basil Fustinis Olive Oil
salt and pepper, to taste

8 ounces pasta

Optional toppings:
Grated parmesan cheese
Fresh arugula or microgreens

Prepare the pesto by combining all the ingredients, except the oil, in a food processor. Begin processing and with the motor running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil. Blend until smooth. Taste test and adjust seasonings if need be. Set aside.
Heat skillet, add basil oil, then the radishes and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
Cook pasta in a pot of boiling water until al dente. Drain pasta, reserving one cup of cooking liquid. Toss the pasta in a bowl with the pesto and radishes. If need be, add the cooking liquid a little at a time if the pasta mixture is dry. Serve with grated parmesan cheese, salt, pepper and fresh arugula or a few micro greens.  Shared by Chef Ali Lopez,   www.ali-lopez.com

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Rhubarb Krisp (variation of Moosewood Cookbook’s Apple Krisp)

  • 5-7 cups Rhubarb, plus 3-4 cups of any berry—I used Raspberries and Red Currants
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/4 cup walnuts
  • 1/4 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup orange juice
  • 2 cups raw oats
  • 3/4 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

 

Chop up fresh rhubarb into 1/2 inch chunks, toss the berries in too.  Drizzle this mix with fresh lemon juice. Spread half of it into a large pan.  Melt butter and honey together.  Combine with oats, flour, nuts, seeds, salts and spices.  Spread 1/2 the mixture (actually crumble, it won’t really spread) onto rhubarb mix in pan.  Cover with remaining rhubarb mix and the rest of the topping.  Pour orange juice over the top.  Bake 40-45 minutes, uncovered, at 375. Cover if it crisps too quickly.

 

Thanks for checking out our webpage!

For more info about O’k CSA:

[email protected]

231-922-2014